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Events

2011 Science, Learning and Censorship – Programme and Podcast

Science, learning and censorship

The very successful international Workshop was recorded, and is now available in podcast, just Click here!

Draft programme

9.30-10.00 Registration

10.00-11.00 Plenary: Professor Paula Findlen (Stanford)

11.00-11.15 Coffee

11.15-12.45 Session 1: Academies and academicians in Venice and the Veneto: J. Walden (Yale) – The early period of the Accademia Olimpica di Vicenza; E. Chayes (Cyprus/Toulouse Le Mirail)– Academic interlopers and their Texts: from Eterei to Incogniti; M. Sangalli (Siena) – Grazio Maria and Sallustio Grazi between the Venetian Academy and the Ambrosiana. The circulation of men, books and ideas in late sixteenth and early seventeenth-century Italy.

12.45-2 pm Lunch2.-3.30 Session 2: Scientific Academies: M. Favaro (Scuola normale, Pisa) – L’Accademia udinese degli Ermafroditi fra curiosità scientifiche e censura religiosa; J. Bek-Thomasen (Aarhus) – “Vir clarissimus”: the diplomatic functions of a natural philosopher; G. Cultrera (Pavia)– “Provando e riprovando”: il motto distintivo degli accademici del Cimento.

3.30-3.45 Tea

3.45-4.30 Session 3: Science and mysticism: Y. Lattes (Bar Ilan)– Jewish Academies and the spreading of mystic manuals in seventeenth-century Italy; D. Montoliu (Toulouse/Scuola normale, Pisa) – Uomini di scienza e accademie scientifiche di Sicilia nel Seicento.

4.30-5.30 Round Table and concluding remarks, chair: Professor Brian Richardson (Leeds)

The image above, as seen by our graphic designer Francesca Brizi

The image at the top of the page, as seen by our graphic designer Francesca Brizi

8 Comments to “2011 Science, Learning and Censorship – Programme and Podcast”

  1. Galileo was named after an ancestor, Galileo Bonaiuti, a physician, university teacher and politician who lived in Florence from 1370 to 1450; at that time in the late 14th century, the family’s surname shifted from Bonaiuti (or Buonaiuti) to Galilei. Galileo Bonaiuti was buried in the same church, the Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence , where about 200 years later his more famous descendant Galileo Galilei was buried too. When Galileo Galilei was 8, his family moved to Florence , but he was left with Jacopo Borghini for two years.

  2. Some features of gardening may explain its recalcitrance with regard to the pedagogy I have proposed. In seventeenth-century France , gardening operated as a manual trade, passed down from father to son. There are famous families of French gardeners-the Mol lets, the Boyceaus, the Le Nôtres–who designed and maintained the royal gardens, wrote gardening books, and traveled to spread French-style gardens to other European nations. For example, Pierre Le Nôtre (1570-1610) was appointed one of the chief gardeners in Catherine de Médicis’s newly created Tuileries Garden in 1571; he was succeeded in this post by his son Jean in 1618, who was in turn succeeded in 1637 by his son André, the renowned designer of Vaux and Versailles.79 Members of the Mollet family comprised an even lengthier gardening dynasty. Jacques, head gardener to the duc d’Aumale, was the father of Claude, the author of Théatres des plans et jardinages , gardener to Henri IV, and designer of gardens at Fontainebleau , Saint-Germain-en-Laye, and the Tuileries. Claude’s son André (d. 1665), author of Le jardin de plaisir , designed gardens abroad–in England , the Netherlands , and Sweden . In 1644 he was named premier jardinier du roi . His sons Pierre and Claude held positions at the Tuileries, while their brother Jacques was head gardener at Fontainebleau . Claude was succeeded by his son Charles, who was in turn succeeded by his son Armand-Claude Mollet.80 Clearly, the traditional system brought security to many French gardening professionals; some also achieved wealth and recognition. (There is a touching story about André Le Nôtre as an old man touring Versailles in a sedan chair alongside the king.) But the profession continued to operate like a manual trade or mechanical art throughout the seventeenth century, and the gardeners themselves didn’t band together to seek the higher status that might come through guilds, societies, academies, and the like.

  3. It was a common practice in the seventeenth century for papal families to exploit their wealth in order to reach such objectives and certainly with no exceptions, the Borghese did apply such manner into reality. Cardinal Scipione as the most entrusted member of the court indeed was the perfect candidate for this important task as his passionate interest in the arts and architecture lead him to be the connoisseur of the family. Art has always been the elite’s prized obsession ever since the time of antiquity as it indicates one’s status and power within the society.

  4. Neapolitan painting of the early seventeenth century is characterized by dramatic expression, emphatic naturalism, and intense chiaroscuro derived from the profound influence of Caravaggio (1571–1610), who spent a number of his later years in the port city. The Denial of Saint Peter ( 1997.167 ) exemplifies the works painted in Naples by the Lombard master and typifies the kind of psychological intensity common in his late paintings. In contrast to the naturalism of Caravaggio, the younger Neapolitan artists were also influenced by the classicism of the Bolognese painter Guido Reni (1575–1642) (among others). Thus, when the Spaniard Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652) arrived in Naples in 1616, he encountered an artistic community of two opposing factions, one leaning toward a progressive naturalism only recently introduced by Caravaggio (he left Naples in 1610), the other trying hard to retain a rigid but successful classical style fostered by Reni. The legacy of Caravaggio prevailed in the end, and Ribera’s painting developed into lyrical and naturalistic depictions of figures and scenes that convey believable and immediate reality in every subject. Ribera also began to make prints soon after his arrival in Naples. Saint Jerome Hearing the Trumpet of the Last Judgment ( 53.512.5 ) and The Poet ( 30.54.69 ) illustrate the artist’s experiments with etching and his fascination with hermit saints, philosophers, and poets.

  5. A period of about 900 years when ancient Greece and then ancient Rome (first as a Republic and then as an Empire) dominated the Meditteranean area, from about 500 B.C. – 400 A.D. We tend to lump these two (Greece and Rome) together because the Romans, when they conquered the areas of Europe under Greek control between 145 and 30 B.C. adopted many aspects of Greek culture, including their pantheon of Gods and Godesses.

  6. The middle of the 1450s saw Ficino begin a practice that continued throughout his life: writing philosophical letters to friends. A noteworthy letter from 1458 shows him interested in four “sects” of philosophers: Platonists, Aristotelians, Stoics, and Epicureans (Ficino, “De sectis philosophorum,” in Kristeller 1938, 2: 7–11). There is little surprising in Ficino’s account, drawn primarily from Latin sources, apart from the minor fact that he devoted more space to Epicureanism than to the other schools, indicative of a possible early “Lucretian” period alluded to in certain sources (Brown; Hankins, Plato). Ficino notes that some Peripatetics have held that Aristotle believed the human soul would die along with the body, though significantly he avoids attributing this position to Aristotle himself.

  7. with particular reference to French philosophy, as the equivalent of the French term ‘Lumières’ (used first by Dubos in 1733 and already well established by 1751). From Immanuel Kant ‘s 1784 essay “Beantwortung der Frage: Was ist Aufklärung?” (” Answering the Question: What is Enlightenment? “) the German term became ‘Aufklärung’.

  8. Neapolitan painting of the early seventeenth century is characterized by dramatic expression, emphatic naturalism, and intense chiaroscuro derived from the profound influence of Caravaggio (1571–1610), who spent a number of his later years in the port city. The Denial of Saint Peter ( 1997.167 ) exemplifies the works painted in Naples by the Lombard master and typifies the kind of psychological intensity common in his late paintings. In contrast to the naturalism of Caravaggio, the younger Neapolitan artists were also influenced by the classicism of the Bolognese painter Guido Reni (1575–1642) (among others). Thus, when the Spaniard Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652) arrived in Naples in 1616, he encountered an artistic community of two opposing factions, one leaning toward a progressive naturalism only recently introduced by Caravaggio (he left Naples in 1610), the other trying hard to retain a rigid but successful classical style fostered by Reni. The legacy of Caravaggio prevailed in the end, and Ribera’s painting developed into lyrical and naturalistic depictions of figures and scenes that convey believable and immediate reality in every subject. Ribera also began to make prints soon after his arrival in Naples. Saint Jerome Hearing the Trumpet of the Last Judgment ( 53.512.5 ) and The Poet ( 30.54.69 ) illustrate the artist’s experiments with etching and his fascination with hermit saints, philosophers, and poets.

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